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i love vous.


Really. I do. Each and everyone of vous. I also love vous, as in the formal and plural in French.

"That's it! She's officially lost it!", I'm sure some of you are thinking. But really, one of my biggest fascinations with the romance languages is the idea of speaking formally and informally, and how this simply does not exist in English. Of course we have our formalities and polite ways of expressing ourselves, but not the distinct difference that exists in Italian, French and Spanish.

It turns out that the romance languages aren't the only ones who follow this guideline (actually, I'm sure all languages do). Last night at a party in the Marais, I was speaking with a Russian-French couple who have had to conduct their relationship in beginner's level English. Since both of their mother languages practice the use of the formal and informal, they have found it strange that this idea does not exist in modern English. They also wanted to know, aside from the formal aspect of it, how do we specify who we are talking to in a room with more than one person in it.

Good question. How do we address more than one person in English? Do we say "you guys"? Or "you all"? Do we make eye contact with each person we're addressing? I honestly forgot. And not in that pretentious "I speak French now therefore I forgot my English" kind of way. I hate that. I really did forget how we clearly direct to whom we're speaking to in a group.

And on a side note: I must be getting old and boring if analyzing grammar and languages is my now "go-to" cocktail party conversation starter. Good Lord.

At family dinners with Aurelien's family, it's unspoken that I'm the only one speaking in the formal vous, echoing family dinners at my ex-fiancé MF's house where I was never invited to speak in the informal. I wonder if Aurelien's family will ever grant me the green light to join in all of the informal fun in tu. I do know that you can't just smuggle it in hoping it will go unnoticed. I tried this method with my French teacher in New York, and each time he would totally shut me down by sternly responding while placing emphasis on the vous.

On our way home from the party on the Vespa, Aurelien asked me if I wanted him to send out an email to his relatives requesting if I can now speak in the informal because even he finds it strange that I'm the only one "vouvoyer-ing" everyone. Never mind the fact that it would come across completely pushy and strange, I had to consider, did I want to take away from the cultural bliss that is speaking completely different than everyone else at the table? Okay, I wouldn't exactly say it's blissful, but it does make me feel kind of special that I'm the only one who speaks formally. I guess I just love the old world-ness of it.

After giving it some thought - like three minutes - I told him that I didn't want to change anything, and for crying out loud do not send out an email that would make me look like a total American bitch. Speaking in the formal vous with my soon-to-be family is just another facet of my experience in France. It's the little things like this that makes life special and different than it was in the States...and I love it.

To my friends in Franco-Anglo relationships, how do you speak to your in-laws? And if you are speaking in tu, at what point did you cross over?

63 comments:

  1. German has a formal form of address also, yes?

    I also agree, better to wait for the invitation to "tu" than to push it or assume it--when it happens, it will feel even more special.

    As for "You" to a room full of people--we say that the sense is "implied" by the context. Yes?

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    1. Does German have the formal? I wouldn't be surprised. I think all of the languages have their own version of speaking formally...right?

      Yeah, I don't have this desperate need to speak in tu, so the email wasn't necessary. I like the idea of vous! It makes me feel prim and respectful!

      As for us, yeah, I think it is implied. I remember this summer when I was speaking to several family members at once, saying to myself, I could really use vous to be clear because some people wouldn't look up...that's a whole other story!

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  2. i agree with JTB! It's more "official" if you just wait for it. with the little French I do speak to my father in law, I only vous but we also don't see each enough or even speak in French enough to the point where he could say "just tu now." While I do this it's wonderful the formal vs. informal, it just cracks me up that Seb is asking if he should send an EMAIL about this ancient language tradition. Love it. Keep us posted when you finally get the tu green light!

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    1. JTB was agreeing with me, actually! My whole point is that I don't want to jump into speaking tu because I love that I'm the only one speaking in the formal. It feels old-fashioned.

      And I said N.O to the email! Hahaha!! It would look like it came from me!

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  3. Hmm.. I use in english "you" when ever I speak english and mainly mean same as french "tu". I'm not native english speaker but I would say still you for vous without the hey you all, you guys stuff. Ha, clear right? In finnish we aren't that formal even it exists, we usually skip the word vous, just using the verb in the right form. Like voulez-vous, would be just voulez.

    Maybe it's just my crappy attitude towards the vouvoying(vouvoyer et tutoyer). I still say vous in the stores and for people that are work related, but it was immediately tutoying with the family of my boyfriend and all new people I meet, it's tu to everyone else. If they demands vouvoying, I turn my back to them :)

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    1. Ah, so Finnish is a bit like Italian where the conjugations are so different that you don't always need the subject? Interesting.

      I guess we all have our own style in tackling this vous/tu thing. I for one, "over-vous" it!

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    2. Trust me... Finnish is like NOTHING else. It's not even indo-european:)

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  4. by the way, we do have formal and informal in english! "you" is the formal and "thou" was the informal (see shakespeare for details) but we were so polite the formal was the form that survived! which is quite nice really

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    1. Thanks Charlotte!!! Excellent response and good to know.

      I love that we were so polite that we can "you" because it was more formal.

      I think I'll try to smuggle in "thou" in conversation at some point today. I hope no one gets offended by my being so informal!

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  5. Wow, I love Charlotte's response. Um, my honey isn't in touch with his family, so I slid past that problem but holy cow even after eleven years the whole "vous" or "tu" thing fills me with worry. I never know when to initiate the switch or if I should. Sigh. Will I ever learn? I slipped into "tu" with my caviste the other day and he went with it--I have been a very regular client (oops) for nearly two years now but afterwards I was wondering "was that too soon?"...!

    I have to agree that you will just have to wait it out. But I really think that because we are foreigners, people often wait longer to make the switch--out of respect. :)

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    1. Her response was great, wasn't it?

      Oh lucky you to have slid past the famous French in-laws and the tu/vous debate!

      I think speaking informally to your caviste after being 2 year regular (quelle coquine!) was acceptable. Did he seem taken back?

      Yeah, I'm definitely waiting and am not sending out some email! Who does that?! "Hey guys what's up - we're taking this informal now. Check it." Yeah...n e v e r....

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  6. That does seem bizarre that you're marrying the guy and you're still vous-ing your future family! (But of course I have no experience in this field.) Maybe when you get married they'll tu!

    It seems a bit random sometimes. I tu everyone I meet in a bar, vous everyone I meet in a shop, but am still left with grey areas at times. I had a meeting on Friday with a young guy who tu'ed me - not that I minded, but seemed strange in a semi-formal situation like that.

    One other thing I find strange sometimes (sort of the opposite of your question about addressing a group in English with you) is when you're talking to one person but meaning "you + someone else". e.g. texting a friend and saying "Vous venez ce soir ?" when you mean "are you and your boyfriend coming?" I sometimes worry that they'll think I've gone a bit mad and started vousvoying them.

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    1. I was never allowed to switch over to tu with MF's family and never attempted it, so maybe it'll be like that with Seb's. Personally, I don't mind. I just find it interesting really.

      I TOTALLY know what you mean when you use vous in like a text, referring to the plural. I have sent out texts that seemed a bit formal, but the recipient and their friends understood I was speaking to them all. At least I assume so...

      If I start speaking in future simple, then we'll have a problem.

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  7. My husband actually scolded me for trying to use tu with his family while his family wasn't bothered by it...

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    1. Oh my. Wow! Okay...GTK - no smuggling in the "tu"!

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    2. To me, using "tu" is not a sign of disrespect, but a sign of affection. When you marry into a family, you should be able to use the more informal "tu". That would show that you're fully integrated.

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  8. Gwan: I do think that misunderstanding happens! I texted a friend of my boyfriend's to ask about him and his girlfriend, using "vous", and my boyfriend said "Why are you vousvoy-ing so-and-so?" And frankly I find it very annoying!

    Also some families never stop the vous-ing. I don't know if it's generational, but my MIL still says vous to her MIL. She told me about six months after I met her that I should say "tu" but otherwise I would probably never have switched. I still say vous to the grandparents and some aunts and uncles. Sometimes it still feels weird though, like I'm being impolite, when I say tu to my in-laws.

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    1. I figured I was "vous"ing for life. At least with his grandparents and his mom...as for his dad and step-mom, that switch was actually made a year ago. They're a little bit rock n' roll! So I guess it depends per case!

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  9. This post is just another reminder of why I'm so bad at French. Whenever I practice French with my boyfriend (which isn't very often), I'll say a phrase with 'tu,' not necessarily referring to him, and he'll always correct me.

    Just to stir things up a bit, I'll bring an Asian language into the mix! In Chinese, they don't have formal/informal pronouns but they have titles, which is how you refer to people, and these titles are arbitrarily bequeathed upon people based on their age and also the number of years between the addresser and the addressee. So, if I, a 25-year-old woman met a woman in her 30s, I'd have to refer to her as 'jiejie' which basically means older sister. But if I met another 25-year-old woman who was born the day after me, I'd still have to call her 'jiejie' because of seniority. But this stops at some point...you wouldn't see a 40-year-old calling a 41-year-old big sister - I think once you reach middle age, you get to call people by their names?

    Anyway, when I was little, I was really shy and also extremely antagonistic with my family. Whenever my parents instructed me to address certain people with certain titles, I refused because I thought it was stupid - plus I just wanted to call people by their names! Because I was always taught to revere and respect those who are older than me - and being that I'm the youngest offspring in my entire family - now that I'm an adult, I have authority issues. I try to avoid addressing my boyfriend's Scottish-Canadian family whenever I can because I'm afraid that the more casual part of me (the one that insists on saying 'tu') is going to call them Bob and Kay. The only time I've had to address his parents is in thank you cards and it's always very formal: Dr. and Mrs. Hunter. The thought of saying one of their names in front of them gives me great anxiety. I just go out of my way to avoid using people's names/titles whenever I can now.

    Do you ever slip and use "tu" when you shouldn't there? Do people get offended?

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    1. How interesting!!!! I knew that the Chinese language had these rules but I didn't know exactly how detailed and specific it was. Wow. Thanks for the explanation, really.

      It's funny that you say that you avoid using names and titles. My cousin was dating his now wife for 10 years and after 8, my grandmother suddenly got offended because she was never addressing them by their names or "Mr." and "Mrs."...something none of us had even noticed...so just keep that in mind, they might be aware...doubtful, but perhaps.

      How come your bf doesn't want you to speak in "tu" for a casual conversation? Interesting!

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    2. Ah, duly noted! Although I'm sure they notice so many other things before they notice I'm not addressing their names.

      Oh, it's not for casual conversations, it's just when I randomly blurt out something French. For instance, I'll be watching television and I'll hear something that I'd like to say in French and try to say it. It's when I'm just trying to replicate speech that the bf will remind me that "vous" is safer to use. I guess that's the difference between someone like me who thinks in English and tries to translate and someone like him who can think in French.

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    3. Oh, and just another funny anecdote. Have you ever met someone who had difficulties understanding "you" vs "you (all)" in English? My bf can't and it's the funniest but most aggravating thing in the world. If I'm trying to use the general "you," he will ALWAYS take it as "you" specifically, even when the subject is obviously really foreign to him.

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  10. I vousvoy Grandma French. She hates it... makes her absolutely mental, which is why I do it. She makes fun of my accent (and thinks Chinese eat baby humans), so I derive great pleasure from torturing her in the politest way possible.
    For everyone else, I play the American ingénue and after several hours of trying very hard to remember who I must vous and who I must tu, I lean over and explain in the most charming way possible that all this is very challenging for an étrangère like myself and do they think it would be at all possible à se tutoyer.
    I agree Seb shouldn't text. You have to ask yourself (if you can't wait) and its best done one on one.

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    1. Why does Grandma French hate it?! I'd think it would be the opposite!! I'll have to ask you about that later!

      Yeah, Seb knows that there will be no communication on our side in regard to this. Speaking regularly in vous just keeps me polished...because when not used frequently, I tend to forget it!

      A tout!

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  11. I'm meeting my boyfriend's family in a little over a week, and I'm secretly hoping they'll say I can use "tu" with them, but I know that's never going to happen. I use "tu" with about 90% of the people I know, and I just know that I'm going to slip up at some point (if not several) during that week. Oy.

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    1. I was thinking of you when I wrote this because I know this date is coming up soon. I wish you the best of luck...like I told you before, they're going to just love you! Can't wait to read about in in a future post...? Will you be sharing? : )

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    2. Yes, I will definitely be sharing! I need to do a blog update, but nothing interesting has really been going on. It's been school, English lessons, homework, and repeat. It bores me living it! I'm sure my week with the family will lead to some good stories! Hopefully, good stories that don't involve me sticking my foot in my mouth.

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  12. Ohhhh the good ole vouvoyer vs tutoyer. I definitely vouvoyer LD's mom, aunts, uncles etc, especially after the mistake I made when I didn't. The first time I met his mom I was so nervous that I totally forgot about the whole vous vs tu thing and made the mistake and answered her "bien, et toi?" He sternly reminded me that it is "vous." It was in that moment I realized just how French his skinny ass is. Anyway, his mom is actually really cool about it; she understands that French isn't my first language so if I slip up she doesn't mind but I try not to so that I don't have to deal with the wrath of LD.

    But sometimes, just to get on his nerves, I vouvoyer him! He thinks it's so weird, but I do it just because I know how much it makes his skin crawl. He thinks it's funny to say things like "dawg" and "shawty" so I think I'm allowed to say vous once in a while. :-)

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    1. Hahahahah! I vouvoyer Seb from time to time to be annoying too! Hahaha! Within seconds, he's like "why are you vousvoyer-ing me?". I don't know why but it makes me giggle. I guess I'm not alone! We're such pain in the ass New Yorkers!

      That's good that your soon-to-be MIL didn't mind the slip. Come on, there needs to be SOME leniency on mistakes! Glad that she was cool about it!

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  13. To answer your Q: I use vous with the parents, aunts, uncles (the older folks!), and tu with the bro's & young cousins. If I'm not sure, I try and see how the other person is addressing me. For some reason "de rien" is preferred with the 'rents, I suppose saying "je vous en prie" is a bit much. Good thing 'cause it's half the energy!

    Addressing plurally: I'd guess it would be a classy "hey guys!" haha ..or what about a Jesse Pinkman "Yo!"

    Ditto sentiment regarding the family mass email-- that's a bit strange.

    Only you could make grammar so sexy, Ella!

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    1. Hhaahah sexy?! You think? Why thank you. I try, you know. ; )

      Jesse Pinkman...I had to google search him. I'm so out of the loopskies. Seb is a huge BB fan..while I'm a different BB fan..as in Bardot! I should really watch an episode. Everyone seems to be freaking out over this show!

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  14. You make me want to learn French just so I can experience a slice of your life! I think your French school should cut you in on their profit!

    You really make me laugh! Thank you for cheering me up today. I needed a good chuckle today.

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    1. Thank you, Allison! I strongly recommend learning another language - any language that calls to you. Learning French and Italian (which needs lots of work) was one of my personal achievements of my 20s!


      I'm glad that I was able to make you smile. I know what it's like to have a hard day...

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  15. that's so interesting...all the frenchies i meet in the U.S. always immediately use "tu" even the teachers (at the alliance Française) and people older than I am ... maybe it is assumed that even though they are older, we are still peers.

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    1. I was scolding at FIAF in NY for using "tu". It was communicated that "vous" was strictly used with the profs. Can't say I blame them and I was glad for it. They polished up my French quite nicely!

      As for French people socially in the States. I have no clue. My French was so bad when I was going to NYC French parties that we all spoke English!

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  16. An email requesting to speak in the informal?! God I love the French.

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  17. I'm on a first name basis and use "tu" with my soon-to-be 83-year-old father-in-law (who doesn't give a damn... really;)) Only two of his children call him "papa" (my husband, for one). The others call him by his first name as well.

    In English, there used to be thou;) Funny that they dropped it:) In Spain, there's a formal and informal collective (ustedes/vosostros-as), but not in Latin America (which is like French and uses the same word for the collective and formal).

    The formal and informal in Russian is the least of their worries, trust me... they have perfective and imperfective verbs which raise all kinds of hell for the foreign speaker.

    I usually use "vous" in new situations, but when we all get more comfy, I simply ask "on peut se tutoyer"? I have yet to meet a needlebutt who gets offended and refuses bluntly.

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    1. Omg, don't even talk to me about Russian. I gave up when they introduced the perfective. I bloody just learnt all these verbs and then you spring a surprise that you've got to learn them all again for the perfective???? That said, I want to start again with Russian, cos I spent 2 years on it and now you'd think I'd done a 6-week internet course or something because I am beyond hopeless...

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    2. @Duchess - In Latin America, they don't use "ustedes"? That's interesting. My Spanish would make any Spaniards skin crawl, that's because I learned it in Southern California where I'd say the vocabulary is slightly different...just a little, wey... : )

      @Gwan - Wow! You attempted Russian. Now THAT should have come up in convo over drinks! I'd love to hear one sentence from you! I really do love that language.

      That's how I felt in French. I was able to craft sentences expressing my emotions and BAM! The subjunctive was thrown in there...you know for good measure! I still get stuck because I wasn't using it in the beginning!

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    3. Of course "usted/es" is used in Latin America, both to address people formally and informally in the plural form. Actually that is all they use because they don't use "vosotros/as" (the informal in plural) like in Spain, where I'm from.

      This whole business of tu and vous is so complicated even for those of us who use it in our mother language. Growing up, I was always taught to address older people and strangers respectfully with "usted/ustedes".

      Times have changed a lot and now young people will talk to me as if I'm one of their peers using "tú", especially in Spain. Latin America still is more respectful with age.
      Sylvia S.
      (I've noticed there's another Sylvia so I'll use the S. from now on)

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  18. I am of an older generation, so it makes me cringe when I hear a young person call an older person by their first name! I know we do it more and more in English, and find it okay if the older person says "call me Dave from now on". I was brought up to always say the title with the sir name, ex. Mr. Smith or Mrs. Jones. I think you must stick to the polite rules of etiquette until given the signal to use "tu", and this is done individual by individual....some relatives just like to remain stodgy and old fashion(!), but it is their right.
    When speaking in a group, we say "all of you", but if we are asking a particular person in that same group a question, we usually say, "tell me, Carol, do you prefer red wine or white?
    (as I sit here drinking a glass of white wine and eating cheese pondering this subject!) When I'm on my third glass, I guess I'll tu and vous inappropriately and not remember it in the morning... :-))
    tant pis

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    1. I'm with you. I think erring on the side of more respectful in ANY language should be expected. But there are parents that don't want that, for example my mother. She refuses to be called Mrs. and there's also respecting the wishes of that person needs to be considered.

      I hope you enjoyed your wine - feel free to comment again after a glass or two. Wine-soaked comments are the best comments! : )

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  19. I have an old friend who's one year my senior and who was raised to use "vous" when speaking to her mother, but not her father. Very odd. When she was growing up, my mother had to use "vous" to her mother, but was later allowed to switch to the more informal "tu" when that informal form was used in prayers... Grandma figured that if you could use "tu" to speak to God, you could use "tu" to speak to her (good point, Grandma!).

    This being said, we're a lot more informal in Quebec than they are in France. I think it might be the Anglo-Saxon influence. You'll be waiting in line at the ATM or the bank and complete strangers will be chatting happily to one another as if nothing!;)

    Plus, we're a lot more forgiving of foreigners using "tu" as we're just so damn happy that they even bother to learn French!:)

    Funny that Seb's parents have not invited you to use "tu" considering the decor of their naughty guest bedroom (I recall a couple of dirty dice on which the imperative SINGULAR was used;))

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    1. ".. we're a lot more informal in Quebec than they are in France. I think it might be the Anglo-Saxon influence" Oh sure! Blame it on us! LOL!!!!

      Seb's dad and his step-mother allow me to tutoyer them actually. This post was excluding them. They're a wild bunch. I love that they will be my in-laws!! When we slept there last weekend, they set up the "love" room with satin heart pillows, petals and feather boas. Gotta love em!

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  20. A very interesting article to let us French people know how "you guys" Americans observe the vous/tu phenomenon !
    I consider it a treasure of my native language.

    As regards the in-laws, I have been married 5 years, I am 30 years old and I would NEVER say "tu" to my mother-in-law (and I never did to my late father-in-law). On the contrary, I say "tu" to the nieces and nephews, aunts and uncles of my husband.

    My parents said "vous" to my then fiancé the first time they met him, and I think my in-laws-to-be also said "vous" to me. I'm even wondering if my father-in-law, now deceased, ever said "tu" to me. It was a very normal situation.

    I'm always shocked when I hear someone saying "tu" to their in-laws. I'm middle class, nothing from the posh spheres, but for me saying "tu" to the in-laws sounds terribly "peuple" (working class). In my view, Ella being in Paris and marrying a Parisian should never think of saying "tu" to her parents-in-law ;-)But to the rest of the family-in-law, no problem.

    I was a teacher for a few years and always took a great delight saying "vous" to my pupils as young as eight (and up to 18). They were always stunned but very thankful.
    Don't forget that in France there is a great experience everyone has in their life : the first time someone addresses you as "vous". I was 13 and I'll always remember !!!

    To conclude, I could write for hours about the beauty and thrill of the "vous" in amourous relationships... Plenty of songs let know of it. Ella, I recommend Françoise Hardy's "Message personnel" for a start, in which she mixes "vous" and "tu" as a reflection of her feelings :-)

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    1. I'm listening to the Françoise song now on youtube! Love it! I guess it's not just me who is fascinated by the distinct differences between the two! I vouvoyer my fiance for laughs and he rolls his eyes. Apparently, he doesn't think it's as funny as I do. Hey, at least I amuse myself!

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    2. I'm jumping into this discussion after Marie's comment because I could tell by the shocked look on the face of my father-in-law's girlfriend (who is from an old noble family in France) that she was surprised that I say "tu" to my f-i-l. I'm sure that she thought that I was being terribly familiar, which is laughable considering that I've known him for almost 30 years and she has only known him for a couple of months and already calls him tu.

      Anyway, it's an interesting topic and one that I've always loved talking about with my Swiss friends, both German and French speaking, because they've been learning how to deal with all of the nuances since birth whereas I still haven't figured everything out yet.

      Interestingly enough, I've started asking my friend's children if they still use the polite form of address and most of them don't except maybe with their bosses. I wouldn't be surprised if the polite form doesn't disappear in a generation or two like thou did from English.

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  21. Superb! Generally I never read whole articles but the way you wrote this information is simply amazing and this kept my interest in reading and I enjoyed it.

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    1. Thank you, Wedding Dresses. I guess this is going to start now...

      : )

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  22. Being a native speaker of Russian, I'd like to chime in on the subject of formal vs. informal forms of address in Russian. I use the "tu" form ("ty") when addressing my mom/dad, but "vous" ("vy") when speaking with my aunt or uncle, even though we are very close. I would say that this is the norm, although in some families, people use "tu" with all members. However, with your in-laws, the rule of thumb is to use "vous" ("vy") to show respect. I've never met anyone who tutoyered their in-laws.

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    1. It all depends really. My soon-to-be brother in-law tutoyers my soon-to-be mother in law on her request. So who's to say really?

      I wasn't curious as to what I should do. I know that the rule of thumb is to always (in any language) err on the side of being more respectful. I was just enjoying the cultural difference, as well as speaking in vous. : )

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  23. I use "vous" with my boyfriend's mom, but his dad told me I can use "tu" with him - only one day after meeting him! When I first met his dad, my boyfriend and I had already been together for two years (one of which was spent long distance) so maybe that played in to him telling me I could use "tu," but he also has 98% hearing loss and reads lips in order to talk to people, so maybe it's easier for him to read my lips when I conjugate the verbs in the "tu" form. My boyfriend thinks it's so weird to hear me use "tu" with his dad, and I do, too. The next time I see him, I'm nervous that he'll forget he told me I could tutoie and think I'm rude!

    Since someone above commented about using "vous" or "tu" in classroom settings, I've had professors say both. When I did a year in an exchange program, the professors (all French) used "tu" with us. I think their rapport with us was a little different since we were in a FLE program. Now that I'm doing an actual Master's degree program, all of my professors "vous" us.

    (I've never commented before, but I love reading your blog).

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    1. Hi Kari!

      Hi and thank you for this insightful comment!

      I have never been in a French class and have been spoken to in the informal. I find that strange considering the profs were speaking to a group. Or was this one-on-one?

      My fiance's dad and stepmom had me speak in tu immediately because vous made them feel old (their words) but the rest, it's all vous land! And I can't say that I mind. I just get stuck with some of the conjugations...good thing I have Seb (whom I can tutoie) to help me!

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  24. Hmm, our French teacher at school had us tu-ing and froing from the off, obviously she was tres uncouth...

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  25. I wish I enjoyed it the way you do. I find it all so very confusing! Maybe I should start thinking of it as a romantic quirk and that might help my outlook :)
    Luckily at both my husband's parent's houses, I was invited into the 'tu' very quickly. I think they were trying to make life easy on me x

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    1. Hahaha, I do enjoy it! Not like blissful in the fields, but I do appreciate the difference.

      I agree that life must be a LOT easier having conversation with your in-laws in the informal. Lucky girl! : )

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  26. Vous is not a tense, it's a subject pronoun.

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    Replies
    1. Ah, woops. Small slip. Thanks so much for the correction, Anonymous!

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    2. Ooooh ça va "anonyme", t'es un peu tâtillon !

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    3. Let's play nice! I made a mistake and it was fixed! Pas de souci! : )

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  27. Interesting post, when do you think you will make the crossover to tu or maybe you never will?

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